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Frequently Asked Questions

This is a list of frequently asked questions. Please read through these to see if your question is answered here.

You may also call us at: 01503 220135

SERVICE RELATED
What are your business hours?
What areas do you service?
What makes you different to other service companies?
COMPUTER QUESTIONS
Do you sell used computers?
What is a virus?
What is a worm?
What is a Trojan?
How do I know if I have a virus?
What is Spyware?
Q: WHAT ARE YOUR HOURS?
A: Regular business hours are from 9:00am to 6:00pm Monday to Friday. The phone is often answered at weekends too so if you have an emergency please call.
Q: WHAT AREAS DO YOU SERVICE?
A: We are based in Looe, and offer onsite support to home and business anywhere in the PL postcode area of Cornwall - Saltash, Launceston, Callington, Liskeard, Bodmin, Lostwithiel, St. Austell, Looe and Polperro and areas inbetween. If you need service out of this area, please call 01503 220135 for availability information.
Q: WHAT MAKES YOU DIFFERENT TO OTHER SERVICE COMPANIES?
A: Many local businesses depend on our services. There are many reasons our customers call us instead of someone else. Here are just a few –

• Chris Edge has 25 years experience in the computer industry working with Windows (desktops, laptops and servers) and Unix.

• We understand computers and technology issues.
• We come to you with onsite and professional service.
• We care about our customers.
• We won’t call a job complete until the problem is resolved.
• For home service, we don't charge a call-out fee and won't charge unless your problem is fixed.
• All work is guaranteed and insured.

Chris Edge Computer Services provides the service and peace of mind you deserve. Call us today!

Q: DO YOU SELL USED COMPUTERS OR PARTS?
A: I am happy to source used PCs on request (which will be sold with warranty), but generally sell new.
Q: WHAT IS A VIRUS?
A: A computer virus is a computer program that can copy itself and infect a computer. The term "virus" is also commonly but erroneously used to refer to other types of malware, including but not limited to adware and spyware programs that do not have the reproductive ability.
A true virus can spread from one computer to another (in some form of executable code) when its host is taken to the target computer; for instance because a user sent it over a network or the Internet, or carried it on a removable medium such as a floppy disk, CD, DVD, or USB drive.
Viruses can increase their chances of spreading to other computers by infecting files on a network file system or a file system that is accessed by another computer.
Q: WHAT IS A WORM?
A: A computer worm is a self-replicating malware computer program, which uses a computer network to send copies of itself to other nodes (computers on the network) and it may do so without any user intervention. This is due to security shortcomings on the target computer. Unlike a computer virus, it does not need to attach itself to an existing program. Worms almost always cause at least some harm to the network, even if only by consuming bandwidth, whereas viruses almost always corrupt or modify files on a targeted computer.
Q: WHAT IS A TROJAN?
A: A Trojan horse, or Trojan, is software that appears to perform a desirable function for the user prior to run or install, but (perhaps in addition to the expected function) steals information or harms the system. The term is derived from the Trojan Horse story in Greek mythology.
Q: HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE A VIRUS?
A: It is not always easy to determine if you have a virus.
In past times, before the advent of the internet, viruses spread through floppy disks, and CDs etc. Their ability to remain undiscovered until it's too late determined the success of that virus. Minimum exposure meant it could spread further without getting discovered, and only then through the damage it caused.
Once the internet, email and instant messaging came along, the priorities of the virus writers changed. Now rather then subtly spread from victim to victim, the idea is for maximum effect of the 'payload' as it were. By the time the virus has finished running, the computer owner knew they had been infected with something, as well as everyone else on their network, or in their address book etc.
The more subtle viruses offer some characteristics to watch out for, these are -


• Computer becomes unresponsive preventing you from doing anything. Processor is at 100% trying to spread the virus (Task Manager).


• Hard disk becoming very busy when you're not doing anything… continually and for no apparent reason. However please be aware that some applications operate in the background sometimes causing erratic disk access.


• The computer tries to dial up to the internet… continually and for no apparent reason. This is not noticeable if the computer is on a network, generally network traffic shoots up and is noticed on the PC which accesses the internet.


• Unexpected things happen when you are using the computer. Crashing applications, strange files appearing, disk space reducing very fast etc.


• You are getting strange messages appearing, messages you would not expect. For example an error reporting a sound card driver error, when you know you have a completely different card in your PC. Or an error with an application which has run fine till then.

Q: WHAT IS SPYWARE?
A: Spyware is a type of malware that can be installed on computers, and which collects small pieces of information about users without their knowledge. The presence of spyware is typically hidden from the user, and can be difficult to detect. Typically, spyware is secretly installed on the user's personal computer. Sometimes, however, spywares such as keyloggers are installed by the owner of a shared, corporate, or public computer on purpose in order to secretly monitor other users.

While the term spyware suggests software that secretly monitors the user's computing, the functions of spyware extend well beyond simple monitoring. Spyware programs can collect various types of personal information, such as Internet surfing habits and sites that have been visited, but can also interfere with user control of the computer in other ways, such as installing additional software and redirecting Web browser activity. Spyware is known to change computer settings, resulting in slow connection speeds, different home pages, and/or loss of Internet connection or functionality of other programs. In an attempt to increase the understanding of spyware, a more formal classification of its included software types is provided by the term privacy-invasive software.

In response to the emergence of spyware, a small industry has sprung up dealing in anti-spyware software. Running anti-spyware software has become a widely recognized element of computer security practices for computers, especially those running Microsoft Windows. A number of jurisdictions have passed anti-spyware laws, which usually target any software that is surreptitiously installed to control a user's computer.